Guest host: Lee Cowan.

COVER STORY: The use of less-lethal force
As protests against police brutality continue around the country, so, too, have the number of people being injured and maimed by what police call “less-lethal” weapons. While most police departments have access to tools designed to control crowds, experts say few are offered any significant training in how to use them. Correspondent Lee Cowan looks into the lethality of such police weapons, and talks with a protester and journalist whose lives have been changed upon being struck by projectiles intended to be non-lethal. 

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The scene at Shankweiler’s Drive-in Theatre in Orefield, Pa.

CBS News

MOVIES: Now showing – The return of the drive-in
Because the coronavirus and social distancing shut down nearly all indoor entertainment venues this summer, going to a drive-in may be just the ticket. Nancy Giles looks into the resurgence of drive-in movie theatres, and their offshoots – projections in parking lots, and screenings on the water.

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They’re one of the most bizarre life forms on Earth – one of the smartest, most interesting, and most alien, with eight more brains than you have.

CBS News

NATURE: Untangling the mysteries of the octopus
The octopus is one of the most bizarre life forms on Earth – one of the smartest, most interesting, and most alien. It can camouflage itself in a flash, squeeze its entire body through a one-inch hole, and use their brains (yes, it has nine of them) to think and play. Correspondent Chip Reid visits scientists at New England Aquarium in Boston, and the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Mass., and talks with Sy Montgomery, author of “The Soul of an Octopus,” about these curious creatures. (This story was originally broadcast on January 12, 2020.)

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PULSE:
TBD

         
SPORTS:
The “underrated” Stephen Curry
With this team, the Golden State Warriors, out of this year’s playoffs, the NBA star has more time to spend with his children – and to watch basketball. Contributor Kelefa Sanneh talks with the 6’3″ shooter about his Underrated Book Club, his youth sports camp, and why he uses his voice to express both his faith and his politics.

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PASSAGE:
TBD
    

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An a-maize-ing vegetable. 

CBS News

FOOD: Corn, from farm to table
Delicious sweet corn is a staple of backyard barbecues, and a “corn-erstone” of traditional Mexican cuisine. Correspondent Martha Teichner has an appreciation of this summertime favorite, and explores how farmers growing heirloom varieties are bringing new flavors of corn to the menu.

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COMMENTARY: 
Jim Gaffigan: America needs some therapy
Our nation’s two political parties are projecting two different realities, and so, the comedian believes it’s time for an intervention.

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Olivia Newton-John wears her “Grease” costume. 

CBS News

MUSIC: Olivia Newton John
In an emotional interview at her Los Angeles home, actress, author and singer Olivia Newton-John talks with “CBS This Morning” co-host Gayle King about battling breast cancer, and the source of her unshakable spirit. (This story originally aired on September 29, 2019.)

READ A BOOK EXCERPT: “Don’t Stop Believin’: A Memoir” by Olivia Newton-John

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HARTMAN:
TBD

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A restored diorama, created in 1940, depicts a free African American, Benjamin Banneker, who surveyed the land that would become Washington, D.C.

CBS News

ART: Preserving dioramas of African American history
In 1940, at the American Negro Exposition in Chicago (marking the 75th anniversary of Emancipation), evocative dioramas were created to celebrate the often-unacknowledged achievements of African Americans. Today, conservators, including African American students, are restoring these dioramas, bringing their magical artistry, and history, back to life. Correspondent Rita Braver reports.

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COMMENTARY:
John Lewis biographer Jon Meacham on the power of our vote
The Pulitzer Prize-winning author says the civil rights icon wanted citizens to use their votes as a means to rebuild America “in the image of God and democracy.”

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NATURE:
Ladybugs
     

WEB EXCLUSIVE:

        
THE BOOK REPORT:
Reviews from Washington Post critic Ron Charles (August 30)
Recommendations of new fiction and non-fiction titles.


The Emmy Award-winning “CBS Sunday Morning” is broadcast on CBS Sundays beginning at 9:00 a.m. ET. Executive producer is Rand Morrison.

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